A Sunny Morning with a Walk at Fort Whyte Alive

It was a beautiful sunny morning with temperatures around -13C (and not much wind) when I headed over to Fort Whyte Alive for a walk. I signed in with my membership card and as I headed out the door, I saw a sign that said paths were very slippery and to use caution. Although it was a slippery path there when I broke my shoulder last year I decided to head out and see for myself. I realized I should have brought the spikes for my shoes, but I didn’t, so I was ready to turn around and return home if it was as bad as the sign said.

Fortunately, the paths were in excellent condition. I watched my step anyway, and in the entire walk there were only a couple of places that I had to be careful for a few steps. I know how icy it can get, but I also know that most of the time, the trails are very good. I’ll try to remember my spikes next time though.

The last 3 photos represent a very sad time in Canada’s history. I can not even begin to understand how the white settlers backed by the Churches and the government decided that the Indigenous Peoples culture should be wiped out. Very young children were torn from their families and taught in residential schools. The ones who survived (and many did not), no longer understood the language or cultures of their people, but also did not fit into the white people world. It has recently been discovered that there are many unmarked graves on some of the residential school grounds.

Each orange ribbon represents a child’s life lost.

If you are interested in learning more, I have a link to one site – but there are many more.

https://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/the_residential_school_system/

2 thoughts on “A Sunny Morning with a Walk at Fort Whyte Alive

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